Vibrant Rose!

There is this rose bush in my garden which struggles to survive every year regardless of what I try to do make it feel happy. But year on year it produces one or two of these really vibrant flowers in autumn! Just one of two roses sadly before the winter frosts kick in.

Vibrant Rose
Click on the photo for a larger version on Flickr!

Technical Details:

  • Nikon D7000 with a 105mm f/2.8 Sigma macro lens
  • f/18, 1/250 second, ISO200
  • Remote slave flash SB800

Granny’s Bonnet – Aquilegia

This year has been very good for the aquilegia plants growing in my garden. This must have something to do with the mild wet winter we’ve just had here in Cambridge. Below is a photograph of a single aquilegia flower. These hardy, and highly toxic perennials also go by the names Columbine ( which comes from the Latin for “dove”, due to their resemblance to five doves clustered together – Wikipedia).

Aquilegia sp.
Aquilegia. Please click on the photo for more viewing options in Flickr.

Technical

  • Nikon D7000 with 105mm f/2.8 Sigma macro lens
  • f/22, 1/60 with remote slave flash fired from underneath
  • Processed in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom and NIK Color Efex Pro.

Tranquility #2

Tranquility #2
At Anglesey Abbey. Click on the photo for a larger version on Flickr

This dream-like scene seen at the National Trust Anglesey Abbey property using an iPhone. To me, everything in here symbolises spring. Daffodils, Hyacinths, Cherry Blossoms and the brilliant hues of a Japanese maple tree.

A flint(stone)

If you came looking for Fred or Wilma Flintstone, then you’ve come to the wrong place :)!

East Anglia and Norfolk in England have many flint stones that can be found littering the countryside. Flints have been used since the stone-age to make sharp-edged weapons like axes and arrow-heads, as well as in the creation of sparks to produce a fire. The flints found in our local area take on peculiar shapes, like the one below which looks like a horseshoe.

Flintstone
A horseshoe-shaped flint. Hinxton, England